median days

Median Days on the Market Declines to Lowest Level of 29 Days in April 2017

In the monthly REALTORS® Confidence Index Survey, the National Association of REALTORS® asks members “For the last house that you closed in the past month, how long was it on the market from listing time to the time the seller accepted the buyer’s offer?”

The chart below shows the median days on market by state.[1] Properties that sold in February–April 2017 were typically on the market for less than 31 days in 18 states and in the District of Columbia, based on the April 2017 REALTORS® Confidence Index Survey Report. Looking at the values over the last few years, in most states the median length of time that properties stay on the market has trended downwards, though the graphs also show that days on market in some states fluctuate seasonally.[2]

median days

 

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Amid strong demand and tight supply, properties sold in April 2017 were typically on the market for 29 days, the shortest time on market since the survey began tracking this measure in 2011, (34 days in March 2017; 39 days in April 2016).[3] The length of time properties are on the market has fallen as demand has outpaced the inventory of homes for sale. In 2011, properties were typically on the market for 97 days.[4]

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Nationally, 52 percent of properties that sold in April 2017 were on the market for less than a month (48 percent in March 2017; 45 percent in April 2016).[5] Only 10 percent of properties were on the market for six months or longer (11 percent in March 2017; 13 percent in April 2016).

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[1] In generating the median days on market at the state level, NAR uses data for the last three surveys to have close to 30 observations. Small states such as AK, ND, SD, MT, VT, WY, WV, DE, and D.C., may have fewer than 30 observations.

[2]To increase the number of observations for each state, NAR uses data from the last three surveys. The selected states shown in these charts are those with approximately 150 observations.

[3] To increase the number of observations for each state, NAR computes the index based on data for the last three months. Small states such as AK, ND, SD, MT, VT, WY, WV, DE, and D.C., may have fewer than 30 observations. The survey asks, “How do you rate the past month’s buyer/seller traffic in the neighborhood(s) or area(s) where you make most of your sales?” Respondents rated conditions or expectations as “Strong (100),” “Moderate (50),” and “Weak (0).” NAR compiles the responses into a diffusion index. For graphical purposes, index values 25 and lower are labeled “Very Weak,” values greater than 25 to 45 are labeled “Weak,” values greater than 45 to 55 are labeled “Moderate,” values greater than 55 to 75 are labeled “Strong,” and values greater than 75 are labeled “Very Strong.” The range of +/-5 around 50 approximates the historical margins of error at the 95 percent confidence level for small states.

[4]The survey asks, “For the last house that you closed in the past month, how long was it on the market from listing time to the time the seller accepted the buyer’s offer?” The median is the number of days at which half of the properties stayed on the market.

[5] Days on market usually refers to the time from listing date to contract date.

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